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In 2017, TIFF Cinematheque revives its tradition of "Summer in France" with retrospectives on Jean-Pierre Melville and Olivier Assayas and a French Crime films series.

On the occasion of the centenary of his birth, TIFF Cinematheque is celebrating Jean-Pierre Melville from June 29 to August 19, 2017. From Bob le flambeur to Leon Morin, priest and Army of shadows, Toronto film buffs will have the opportunity to discover all summer long the filmography of the legendary French director. The retrospective includes :

Le Samouraï (1967)

A favourite of directors as diverse as John Woo (who called it "the closest thing to a perfect movie I have ever seen") and Rainer Werner Fassbinder (who paid lavish homage to it in Love is Colder Than Death), Le Samouraï is now widely considered the greatest achievement of Melville's late period. Alain Delon, unflinching killing machine in trench coat and fedora, plays "le samourai," a contract assassin who performs his executions with meticulous care.
Screening times :
June 29, 6:30 pm
August 19, 4 pm

Army of Shadows (1969)

Flinty Lino Ventura plays Philippe Gerbier, a Resistance leader who escapes from the Gestapo and goes after the turncoats who betrayed his cadre; Simone Signoret brings fatalistic fatigue to her role as one of Gerbier's operatives, whose love for her daughter is eventually turned against her. Melville, who worked for the Resistance during the war, called the Joseph Kessel novel on which the film is based "the greatest and most comprehensive document about this tragic period in the history of humanity," and the director does it full justice, giving Army of Shadows a clenched, existential tone, a steely visual design and an epic sense of gravity.
Screening times :
June 30, 6:15 pm
July 30, 2:30 pm

Les Enfants terribles (1950)

Truffaut declared that with Les Enfants terrible "Cocteau's best novel became Melville's best film," and he claimed to Melville that he had seen the film more than 25 times. The "terrible children" are teenage twins, Paul (Edouard Dermit) and Élisabeth (Nicole Stéphane of Le Silence de la mer), who act out their obsessions and incestuous games in the cluttered room they share. After their bedridden mother passes away, the siblings lure a school friend of Paul's and a shy young dressmaker into their cloistered dream world, where Élisabeth's malicious scheming eventually leads to tragedy.
Screening times :
July 2, 3:45 pm (preceded by 24 hours in the life of a clown)

Bob le Flambeur (1955)

The French New Wave is born in Bob le flambeur, which had a direct influence on many young filmmakers (especially Godard, who salutes it in Breathless). Roger Duchesne, the proverbial "silver fox," plays an aging gambler who, down on his luck, masterminds an impossible heist: the robbery of the casino at Deauville. Though the robbery plans are rendered with characteristic excitement, and the relationship between Bob "le flambeur" and his adopted son's girlfriend is detailed with tender insight, the film is best known for its moody, poetic portrait of Paris, captured in Henri Decäe's glistening black-and-white cinematography.
Screening times :
July 7, 9 pm

Two Men in Manhattan (1959)

In his only starring role, Melville himself plays Moreau, a bow-tied journalist assigned to find out why a French diplomat and Resistance hero suddenly disappeared from the United Nations. He drags another journalist, an alcoholic photographer for Paris-Match, out of his sodden bed to accompany him, and the two men trawl Manhattan nightclubs and backstage dressing rooms to question various women from the diplomat's promiscuous life.
Screening times :
July 9, 6 pm

Le Silence de la Mer (1949)

Adapted from the clandestinely published 1942 novel by Vercors, Le Silence de la mer is set in a small French town during the Nazi Occupation, where a young woman (Nicole Stéphane) and her elderly uncle are forced to provide lodgings for a German officer (Howard Vernon). Unnerved by his hosts' refusal to speak to him (and attracted by the niece's refinement), the German carries on a soliloquy throughout his weeks and months in the house, revealing his doubts, sensitivity, and nostalgia for the culture that has been lost in the barbarity of war.
Screening times :
July 15, 4:15 pm

Léon Morin, priest (1961)

This moving exploration of contested faith (which Melville, a Jewish atheist, adapted from a famous autobiographical novel about the German Occupation) proved a phenomenal popular success upon its release. Jean-Paul Belmondo (who cited his performance here as his personal favourite, though he had to be coaxed into the role by Melville) and Emmanuelle Riva, who had recently risen to stardom in, respectively, Breathless and Hiroshima mon amour, are faultlessly incorporated into Melville's universe, the director's resolute style turning what might have been a tawdry tale about an atheist Communist (Riva) who falls in love with a handsome priest (Belmondo) into an intense, sexually charged study of spiritual crisis and consolation.
Screening times :
July 16, 3:30 pm
 

Le Deuxième souffle (1966)

Ten years into his life sentence, legendary gangster Gu Minda (Lino Ventura) escapes from prison (in a breakout sequence often compared to that of Bresson's A Man Escaped) and traverses a terrain of clubs, bars and bare rooms as he sets out to wreak revenge on the hoods who are blackmailing his sister.
Screening times :
July 25, 6 pm

The Red Circle (1970)

Taking its title from an apocryphal Buddhist maxim invented by Melville and drawing heavily on one of Melville's favourite films, Jules Dassin's Rififi, The Red Circle stars a trio of Europe's most iconic actors — Alain Delon, Yves Montand and Gian Maria Volonté — as professional crooks drawn together by fate. Delon, just released from a Marseilles prison, encounters Volonté when the latter hides in the trunk of his car after escaping on his way to jail. The two hook up with Montand, an alcoholic ex-detective turned marksman for hire, and set out to rob a seemingly impregnable jewellery store in Paris.
Screening times :
July 28, 6:15 pm
 

Le Doulos (1962)

Quentin Tarantino called Le Doulos "my favourite screenplay of all time," and one can see in its twisty tale of treachery a template for Reservoir Dogs. Serge Reggiani plays a recently released ex-con plotting a high-stakes jewel robbery, while Jean-Paul Belmondo, still somewhat Breathless, plays his accomplice, a petty thief who may or may not be a "finger man" (stool pigeon) plotting to turn his pal over to the police.
Screening times :
July 29, 6 pm

When you read this letter (1953)

A young novice in a Cannes convent leaves the nunnery to assume charge over both her vulnerable younger sister and a bookstore she has inherited from their parents. (The would-be nun is played by chanteuse Juliette Gréco, so you really can't expect her to stay in wimples.) Her sister has fallen under the spell of a sex-craving mechanic who is capable of theft, rape, and (this being Melville) all manner of treachery. The film's sexual politics can leave one queasy, but critics have increasingly warmed to this hard-bitten Riviera tale.
Screening times :
August 3, 6:30 pm

Un flic (1972)

Like Robert Bresson's final work L'Argent, Melville's last film offers an intensification of the director's style and vision. More inward than ever, Alain Delon is the flic of the terse title, police commissioner Edouard Coleman, who is intent upon capturing a gang of bank robbers whose larceny has turned lethal of late. Coleman reluctantly shares his girlfriend Cathy (Catherine Deneuve) with a smooth nightclub owner (Richard Crenna) whose camaraderie with the cop helps disguise his status as master criminal.
Screening times :
August 12, 3:30 pm

 

For the complete schedule and to booking tickets, please visit : http://www.tiff.net/#series=army-of-shadows-the-films-of-jean-pierre-melville

 

 

TIFF Bell Lightbox Reitman Square 350 King St W Toronto

TORONTO - Jean-Pierre Melville retrospective at TIFF Cinematheque

When
Du 29 juin au 19 août 2017
Where
TIFF Bell Lightbox
Reitman Square
350 King St W
Toronto

In 2017, TIFF Cinematheque revives its tradition of "Summer in France" with retrospectives on Jean-Pierre Melville and Olivier Assayas and a French Crime films series.

On the occasion of the centenary of his birth, TIFF Cinematheque is celebrating Jean-Pierre Melville from June 29 to August 19, 2017. From Bob le flambeur to Leon Morin, priest and Army of shadows, Toronto film buffs will have the opportunity to discover all summer long the filmography of the legendary French director. The retrospective includes :

Le Samouraï (1967)

A favourite of directors as diverse as John Woo (who called it "the closest thing to a perfect movie I have ever seen") and Rainer Werner Fassbinder (who paid lavish homage to it in Love is Colder Than Death), Le Samouraï is now widely considered the greatest achievement of Melville's late period. Alain Delon, unflinching killing machine in trench coat and fedora, plays "le samourai," a contract assassin who performs his executions with meticulous care.
Screening times :
June 29, 6:30 pm
August 19, 4 pm

Army of Shadows (1969)

Flinty Lino Ventura plays Philippe Gerbier, a Resistance leader who escapes from the Gestapo and goes after the turncoats who betrayed his cadre; Simone Signoret brings fatalistic fatigue to her role as one of Gerbier's operatives, whose love for her daughter is eventually turned against her. Melville, who worked for the Resistance during the war, called the Joseph Kessel novel on which the film is based "the greatest and most comprehensive document about this tragic period in the history of humanity," and the director does it full justice, giving Army of Shadows a clenched, existential tone, a steely visual design and an epic sense of gravity.
Screening times :
June 30, 6:15 pm
July 30, 2:30 pm

Les Enfants terribles (1950)

Truffaut declared that with Les Enfants terrible "Cocteau's best novel became Melville's best film," and he claimed to Melville that he had seen the film more than 25 times. The "terrible children" are teenage twins, Paul (Edouard Dermit) and Élisabeth (Nicole Stéphane of Le Silence de la mer), who act out their obsessions and incestuous games in the cluttered room they share. After their bedridden mother passes away, the siblings lure a school friend of Paul's and a shy young dressmaker into their cloistered dream world, where Élisabeth's malicious scheming eventually leads to tragedy.
Screening times :
July 2, 3:45 pm (preceded by 24 hours in the life of a clown)

Bob le Flambeur (1955)

The French New Wave is born in Bob le flambeur, which had a direct influence on many young filmmakers (especially Godard, who salutes it in Breathless). Roger Duchesne, the proverbial "silver fox," plays an aging gambler who, down on his luck, masterminds an impossible heist: the robbery of the casino at Deauville. Though the robbery plans are rendered with characteristic excitement, and the relationship between Bob "le flambeur" and his adopted son's girlfriend is detailed with tender insight, the film is best known for its moody, poetic portrait of Paris, captured in Henri Decäe's glistening black-and-white cinematography.
Screening times :
July 7, 9 pm

Two Men in Manhattan (1959)

In his only starring role, Melville himself plays Moreau, a bow-tied journalist assigned to find out why a French diplomat and Resistance hero suddenly disappeared from the United Nations. He drags another journalist, an alcoholic photographer for Paris-Match, out of his sodden bed to accompany him, and the two men trawl Manhattan nightclubs and backstage dressing rooms to question various women from the diplomat's promiscuous life.
Screening times :
July 9, 6 pm

Le Silence de la Mer (1949)

Adapted from the clandestinely published 1942 novel by Vercors, Le Silence de la mer is set in a small French town during the Nazi Occupation, where a young woman (Nicole Stéphane) and her elderly uncle are forced to provide lodgings for a German officer (Howard Vernon). Unnerved by his hosts' refusal to speak to him (and attracted by the niece's refinement), the German carries on a soliloquy throughout his weeks and months in the house, revealing his doubts, sensitivity, and nostalgia for the culture that has been lost in the barbarity of war.
Screening times :
July 15, 4:15 pm

Léon Morin, priest (1961)

This moving exploration of contested faith (which Melville, a Jewish atheist, adapted from a famous autobiographical novel about the German Occupation) proved a phenomenal popular success upon its release. Jean-Paul Belmondo (who cited his performance here as his personal favourite, though he had to be coaxed into the role by Melville) and Emmanuelle Riva, who had recently risen to stardom in, respectively, Breathless and Hiroshima mon amour, are faultlessly incorporated into Melville's universe, the director's resolute style turning what might have been a tawdry tale about an atheist Communist (Riva) who falls in love with a handsome priest (Belmondo) into an intense, sexually charged study of spiritual crisis and consolation.
Screening times :
July 16, 3:30 pm
 

Le Deuxième souffle (1966)

Ten years into his life sentence, legendary gangster Gu Minda (Lino Ventura) escapes from prison (in a breakout sequence often compared to that of Bresson's A Man Escaped) and traverses a terrain of clubs, bars and bare rooms as he sets out to wreak revenge on the hoods who are blackmailing his sister.
Screening times :
July 25, 6 pm

The Red Circle (1970)

Taking its title from an apocryphal Buddhist maxim invented by Melville and drawing heavily on one of Melville's favourite films, Jules Dassin's Rififi, The Red Circle stars a trio of Europe's most iconic actors — Alain Delon, Yves Montand and Gian Maria Volonté — as professional crooks drawn together by fate. Delon, just released from a Marseilles prison, encounters Volonté when the latter hides in the trunk of his car after escaping on his way to jail. The two hook up with Montand, an alcoholic ex-detective turned marksman for hire, and set out to rob a seemingly impregnable jewellery store in Paris.
Screening times :
July 28, 6:15 pm
 

Le Doulos (1962)

Quentin Tarantino called Le Doulos "my favourite screenplay of all time," and one can see in its twisty tale of treachery a template for Reservoir Dogs. Serge Reggiani plays a recently released ex-con plotting a high-stakes jewel robbery, while Jean-Paul Belmondo, still somewhat Breathless, plays his accomplice, a petty thief who may or may not be a "finger man" (stool pigeon) plotting to turn his pal over to the police.
Screening times :
July 29, 6 pm

When you read this letter (1953)

A young novice in a Cannes convent leaves the nunnery to assume charge over both her vulnerable younger sister and a bookstore she has inherited from their parents. (The would-be nun is played by chanteuse Juliette Gréco, so you really can't expect her to stay in wimples.) Her sister has fallen under the spell of a sex-craving mechanic who is capable of theft, rape, and (this being Melville) all manner of treachery. The film's sexual politics can leave one queasy, but critics have increasingly warmed to this hard-bitten Riviera tale.
Screening times :
August 3, 6:30 pm

Un flic (1972)

Like Robert Bresson's final work L'Argent, Melville's last film offers an intensification of the director's style and vision. More inward than ever, Alain Delon is the flic of the terse title, police commissioner Edouard Coleman, who is intent upon capturing a gang of bank robbers whose larceny has turned lethal of late. Coleman reluctantly shares his girlfriend Cathy (Catherine Deneuve) with a smooth nightclub owner (Richard Crenna) whose camaraderie with the cop helps disguise his status as master criminal.
Screening times :
August 12, 3:30 pm

 

For the complete schedule and to booking tickets, please visit : http://www.tiff.net/#series=army-of-shadows-the-films-of-jean-pierre-melville