film tv & new media / events / VANCOUVER - French French @ DOXA

DOXA Documentary Film Festival is very proud to offer this third edition of French French with seven new extraordinary films, and a program of the works of the most seminal filmmaker Chris Marker.

From Swagger, Olivier Babinet’s bright, bold explosion of youthful energy, and some angst, to the more reflective and insular moments captured in Eliane de Latour’s Little Go Girls, this collection of contemporary French films speaks to the power, vibrancy, and vivre of documentary cinema.

Brochure French-French

Find the full list  and buy tickets at DOXA.


Swagger
Olivier Babinet | France | 2016 | 84 minutes

From its bravura opening POV shot, swooping like a bird of prey over an urban nightscape, Olivier Babinet’s film announces itself with a grand flourish. Swagger, indeed!


Little Go Girls
Eliane de Latour  | France | 2015 | 80 minutes

Recalling the work of Portuguese master Pedro Costa, in particular his Fontainhas trio (Ossos, In Vanda’s Room, and Colossal Youth) Little Go Girls has the same almost magisterial quality of image. The women and girls who ply their trade initially regard de Latour’s camera with benign indifference. But the relationship between the women and the filmmaker gradually grows more trusting.


Vers la tendresse (Towards Tenderness)
Alice Diop | France | 2016 | 38 minutes

Along the sidewalks and cafés of Seine-Saint- Denis, groups of young men, dressed in hoodies and streetwear, talk with remarkable bluntness and honesty about love, desire, sex, and race. As one man says “White people experience love They were taught how.” Made with a shattering level of intimacy, Alice Diop’s film is both a cinepoem and a piercing statement on the nature of disenfranchisement.


Brûle la mer (Burn the Sea)
Maki Berchache & Nathalie Nambot | France/Tunisia | 2014 | 75 minutes

The opening shot in Brûle la mer of roiling storm-tossed seas moving in perpetual motion sets the tone for the cinepoem to come. Elegantly constructed, the film employs the age-old device of someone telling you a story. In this case, the narrative is that of young Tunisian refugees (some 25,000) including Maki and his two brothers, who fled their country after the 2011 Jasmine Revolution.


Être-Cheval (Horse-Being)
Jérôme Clément-Wilz | France | 2016 | 63 minutes

When a transgender ex-schoolteacher named Karen travels to the US to work with an old cowboy in an extended series of "Pony Play" sessions, the rituals of domination and submission between trainer and trainee must be strictly observed. In the arena where they work, Karen is taught the rigors of donning a bit and bridle, how to walk in ornate leather hooves, and how to pull a cart.


Le Concours (The Graduation)
Claire Simon  | France | 2016 | 119 minutes

The title, translated as “the entrance exam,” is an in-depth and intimate look at the students looking to gain a place in La Fémis, one of the most famous and prestigious film schools in the world (Simon herself was the Head of Directing Studies).  As the budding cinéastes struggle to find a place, the narrative spends a good deal of time with their interlocutors, pulling back the curtain to reveal the depth of seriousness and care that is extended to the students.


Chris Marker, Never Explain, Never Complain
Jean-Marie Barbe and Arnaud Lambert | France | 2016 | 144 minutes

The life and work of Chris Marker could easily fill several documentary portraits, maybe even several freight trains, but directors Jean-Marie Barbe and Arnaud Lambert have kept it to a brisk 144 minutes. As our guest curator Thierry Garrel states in his introductory essay, Never Explain, Never Complain “portrays the cinéaste and his works through testimonies of seven people who knew him and worked with him.”


Retrospective Chris Marker

Le Tombeau d'Alexandre (The Last Bolshevik)
Chris Marker | France | 1993 | 116 minutes

Une Journée d’Andrei Arsenevitch (One Day In The Life Of Andrei Arsenevich)
Chris Marker | France | 1999 | 55 minutes

Le Fond de l'air est rouge (A Grin Without a Cat) Parts 1 & 2
Chris Marker | France | 1977 | 90 minutes

L'Héritage de la chouette (The Owl’s Legacy)
Chris Marker | France |1989 | 80 minutes

Le Souvenir d'un avenir (Remembrance of Things to Come)
Chris Marker and Yannick Bellon | France | 2001 | 42 minutes

Chats perchés (The Case of the Grinning Cat)
Chris Marker | France | 2004 | 58 minutes


Find the full list  and buy tickets at DOXA.

With the support of Cultural Services of the Embassy of France in Canada, Institut Français, SCAM and Unifrance.

The Cinematheque / SFU Woodwards / Vancity Theatre 1131 Howe St #200, Vancouver, BC V6Z 2L7, Canada

VANCOUVER - French French @ DOXA

When
From 4 to 14 May, 2017
Where
The Cinematheque / SFU Woodwards / Vancity Theatre
1131 Howe St #200, Vancouver, BC V6Z 2L7, Canada

DOXA Documentary Film Festival is very proud to offer this third edition of French French with seven new extraordinary films, and a program of the works of the most seminal filmmaker Chris Marker.

From Swagger, Olivier Babinet’s bright, bold explosion of youthful energy, and some angst, to the more reflective and insular moments captured in Eliane de Latour’s Little Go Girls, this collection of contemporary French films speaks to the power, vibrancy, and vivre of documentary cinema.

Brochure French-French

Find the full list  and buy tickets at DOXA.


Swagger
Olivier Babinet | France | 2016 | 84 minutes

From its bravura opening POV shot, swooping like a bird of prey over an urban nightscape, Olivier Babinet’s film announces itself with a grand flourish. Swagger, indeed!


Little Go Girls
Eliane de Latour  | France | 2015 | 80 minutes

Recalling the work of Portuguese master Pedro Costa, in particular his Fontainhas trio (Ossos, In Vanda’s Room, and Colossal Youth) Little Go Girls has the same almost magisterial quality of image. The women and girls who ply their trade initially regard de Latour’s camera with benign indifference. But the relationship between the women and the filmmaker gradually grows more trusting.


Vers la tendresse (Towards Tenderness)
Alice Diop | France | 2016 | 38 minutes

Along the sidewalks and cafés of Seine-Saint- Denis, groups of young men, dressed in hoodies and streetwear, talk with remarkable bluntness and honesty about love, desire, sex, and race. As one man says “White people experience love They were taught how.” Made with a shattering level of intimacy, Alice Diop’s film is both a cinepoem and a piercing statement on the nature of disenfranchisement.


Brûle la mer (Burn the Sea)
Maki Berchache & Nathalie Nambot | France/Tunisia | 2014 | 75 minutes

The opening shot in Brûle la mer of roiling storm-tossed seas moving in perpetual motion sets the tone for the cinepoem to come. Elegantly constructed, the film employs the age-old device of someone telling you a story. In this case, the narrative is that of young Tunisian refugees (some 25,000) including Maki and his two brothers, who fled their country after the 2011 Jasmine Revolution.


Être-Cheval (Horse-Being)
Jérôme Clément-Wilz | France | 2016 | 63 minutes

When a transgender ex-schoolteacher named Karen travels to the US to work with an old cowboy in an extended series of "Pony Play" sessions, the rituals of domination and submission between trainer and trainee must be strictly observed. In the arena where they work, Karen is taught the rigors of donning a bit and bridle, how to walk in ornate leather hooves, and how to pull a cart.


Le Concours (The Graduation)
Claire Simon  | France | 2016 | 119 minutes

The title, translated as “the entrance exam,” is an in-depth and intimate look at the students looking to gain a place in La Fémis, one of the most famous and prestigious film schools in the world (Simon herself was the Head of Directing Studies).  As the budding cinéastes struggle to find a place, the narrative spends a good deal of time with their interlocutors, pulling back the curtain to reveal the depth of seriousness and care that is extended to the students.


Chris Marker, Never Explain, Never Complain
Jean-Marie Barbe and Arnaud Lambert | France | 2016 | 144 minutes

The life and work of Chris Marker could easily fill several documentary portraits, maybe even several freight trains, but directors Jean-Marie Barbe and Arnaud Lambert have kept it to a brisk 144 minutes. As our guest curator Thierry Garrel states in his introductory essay, Never Explain, Never Complain “portrays the cinéaste and his works through testimonies of seven people who knew him and worked with him.”


Retrospective Chris Marker

Le Tombeau d'Alexandre (The Last Bolshevik)
Chris Marker | France | 1993 | 116 minutes

Une Journée d’Andrei Arsenevitch (One Day In The Life Of Andrei Arsenevich)
Chris Marker | France | 1999 | 55 minutes

Le Fond de l'air est rouge (A Grin Without a Cat) Parts 1 & 2
Chris Marker | France | 1977 | 90 minutes

L'Héritage de la chouette (The Owl’s Legacy)
Chris Marker | France |1989 | 80 minutes

Le Souvenir d'un avenir (Remembrance of Things to Come)
Chris Marker and Yannick Bellon | France | 2001 | 42 minutes

Chats perchés (The Case of the Grinning Cat)
Chris Marker | France | 2004 | 58 minutes


Find the full list  and buy tickets at DOXA.

With the support of Cultural Services of the Embassy of France in Canada, Institut Français, SCAM and Unifrance.

related